Education

9 Types of Students You’ll Meet in School

9 Types of Students You’ll Meet in School

We all see the world in our own unique way. While each of these perspectives is valid, they are limited. We all have a personality that influences how we interact with the world: how we teach, learn, work, and communicate are all influenced by our individual personality traits. Our personality types as students cause us to prefer certain methods of learning. Students’ differing perspectives, values, and preferences can lead to misunderstanding and frustration.

When we have a better understanding of other people, we have more compassion, acceptance, and tolerance for them. Our motivation is a strong force that drives the majority of our behavior. When the world around us supports, understands, and reinforces our motivation, a powerful tailwind aligns with all of our energy, propelling us forward. Let’s look at the nine different types of students:

The serious, hardworking type

Their motivation is to be good and correct, and their primary focus is usually on what is wrong or not as it should be. They usually adhere to all rules, standards, and principles to ensure that all expectations are met. Serious, hardworking students have a basic learning style that includes being attentive in class, taking thorough notes, wanting to know the rules, learning in a logical, step-by-step manner, and meticulously attending to details.

Their ideal classroom is one in which everyone is responsible, self-disciplined, and conscientious, as well as values hard work, truth, and fairness; one in which rules are fair and reasonable, and are consistently enforced; and one in which work is well planned. You may also notice that their communication style typically includes a serious, unemotional voice, clarity, focus on the point and on the topic, strong convictions, and morality. They frequently say, “I should…”

The people-pleaser

Their motivation is to be recognized, and their primary focus is usually on others and their needs. They usually earn praise by being helpful to others. People pleasing mentors have a basic learning style that includes wanting an emotional connection to the lesson, focusing on people and applications, learning well from role models, and connecting with passionate and joyful teachers.

Their ideal classroom is a positive and nurturing environment where thoughtfulness and emotional connection are valued, as well as group work and discussion. They prefer small, beautifully appointed classrooms with a human touch. You may also notice that their communication style usually includes affectionate gestures, smiles, and eye contact. They make others feel accepted by asking personal questions and lavishing compliments.

The star of the class type

Their motivation is to succeed, and their primary focus is usually on outcomes and achievement. They usually use a strategy to gain the respect of others. This type of student’s basic learning style includes a desire to improve skill and ability as well as hands-on, practical, and experiential learning. They frequently reduce lessons to key concepts and outcomes and are usually eager to get started.

Their ideal classroom is a place that that values self-improvement and competency, where expectations are clearly defined. They like to have a visible reward system and prefer hands-on application of what is taught. You may also notice that their communication style usually depicts a positive image and a motivating, can-do attitude. They are natural charmers and prefer doing to talking about doing.

The creative misunderstood type

Their motivation is to discover a special and distinct identity, and their primary focus is usually on what is lacking. They usually abandon convention in order to draw attention to “how I’m different.” The misunderstood creative student’s basic learning style includes a desire for a personal and emotional connection to lesson content. They put their heart and soul into their work, but they usually wait until the mood strikes before studying. They are extremely sensitive to criticism and rejection.

Their ideal classroom is one in which self-expression, creativity, and emotional authenticity are valued, where students can personalize their work, and where they can explore their creativity and mood. They prefer environments that allow them to express their creativity and mood. You may also notice that their communication style emphasizes meaning and symbolism. They have a dramatic and emotional flair, are personally revealing, and usually engage in deep philosophical debate.

The intellectual outsider type

Their motivation is to be competent and intelligent, and they are primarily concerned with what they know and do well. They usually withdraw from society to study those topics. The intellectual outsider’s basic learning style includes comprehension before participation, satisfaction with full comprehension of a topic, analysis, finding patterns, speculation, and analysis. They learn best by observing (lectures and books).

Their ideal classroom is one in which knowledge, originality, and curiosity are valued, topics are explored individually and in depth, intellectual discussions are held, and there is plenty of quiet time. You may also notice that their style of communication usually portrays talkativeness while discussing matters of great personal interest or mastery. They are usually reserved and quiet, factual and unemotional, and they think a lot before speaking.

The inquisitive friend type

Their motivation is to feel safe and supported, and their primary focus is usually on uncertainties, risks, dangers, and the unknown. They usually seek advice from people they can trust. This type of student’s basic learning style can be summarized as “questions, questions, questions.” They are usually detailed and rational in their analysis of things, prefer structure, framework, and justified rules, and are good at detecting problems or deviations.

Their ideal classroom is one that values social support, dependability, and responsibility, and where questions are welcomed and answered. They prefer a trusting, predictable, and structured environment. They are usually gregarious and likeable, but they are often shy about speaking in public. They are also frequently skeptical, cautious, inquisitive, and enjoy playing the devil’s advocate.

The cheer leading type

Their motivation is to be happy and fulfilled, and they tend to focus on the positive. They typically seek happiness and excitement in their surroundings. The cheerleader’s basic learning style includes learning by association, mental exploration, and experimentation. They learn quickly and can jump right into the action without needing to see the big picture.

Their ideal classroom is one that values enthusiasm, spontaneity, and openness, one that is fast-paced, dynamic, interactive, and free of constraints and limitations. They are usually talkative, enthusiastic, nonlinear, and engage in a lot of free association, but they frequently go off on tangents.

The challenging type

Their motivation is usually to protect themselves and maintain control, and their primary focus is usually on power and justice. They enjoy claiming their independence. The challengers learn on their own with little supervision. They prefer practice over theory, prefer to get their hands dirty, and enjoy class discussions, particularly debates.

Their ideal classroom is one of authority, confidence, and vision, with a high level of engagement and bold action. They prefer places with lively debates and fair rules. They hate when they can’t add their own opinion to class discussions and state opinions as facts. They always tell the direct, brutal, and honest truth and frequently use profanity prematurely.

The accommodating companion

Their motivation is to be at peace, and their primary focus is usually on the perspectives of others. They typically deny their own desires and opinions in order to accommodate others. The accommodating companion’s basic learning style includes immersion, experiential exercises, physical movement, repetition, routine, predictability, and structure.

Their ideal classroom is one that values stability, groundedness, and balance, one that is happy, comfortable, and free of stress. They prefer calm environments that emphasize the big picture and the interconnectedness of all things. They usually have calm, peaceful voices, are indirect and subtle. They ramble answers, struggle to verbalize specifics, and occasionally state other people’s opinions as their own.

Sending
User Review
0 (0 votes)