Travels and Tourism

The Regent’s Park | A Green Oasis in the City

The Regent's Park

What is there to see at The Regent’s Park?

Wander through Queen Mary’s Gardens and surround yourself with the scent of nearly 12,000 roses. Keep an eye out for the ‘Royal Parks’ rose as you make your way through the garden which is also home to the Delphinium border and Begonia Garden.

The park is full of wildlife, particularly birds including a colony of grey herons near the boating lake, where you can also hire boats and pedalos during the summer months.

To see more exotic animals head to the northern edge of the park where you’ll find London Zoo. The zoo is home to more than 700 animal species such as meerkats, penguins, lions and giraffes.

For a more active day out, you’ll find plenty of sports and leisure options on offer including a running track, tennis courts, football, cricket and rugby pitches.

If culture is more your thing, check out Regent’s Park Open Air Theatre which hosts a programme of events from May to September. Enjoy plays, musicals and comedy in a magical setting surrounded by trees and greenery.

To soak up some spectacular views across the city, make your way to the top of Primrose Hill. This grassy area was once a place where duels were fought and prize-fights took place. Now you can see Shakespeare’s Tree, planted to mark the 300th anniversary of Shakespeare’s birth.

What is there to see at The Regent’s Park?

There is plenty to see and do in the 395 acres that make up The Regent’s Park.

Wander through Queen Mary’s Gardens and surround yourself with the scent of nearly 12,000 roses. Keep an eye out for the ‘Royal Parks’ rose as you make your way through the garden which is also home to the Delphinium border and Begonia Garden.

The park is full of wildlife, particularly birds including a colony of grey herons near the boating lake, where you can also hire boats and pedalos during the summer months.

To see more exotic animals head to the northern edge of the park where you’ll find London Zoo. The zoo is home to more than 700 animal species such as meerkats, penguins, lions and giraffes.

For a more active day out, you’ll find plenty of sports and leisure options on offer including a running track, tennis courts, football, cricket and rugby pitches.

If culture is more your thing, check out Regent’s Park Open Air Theatre which hosts a programme of events from May to September. Enjoy plays, musicals and comedy in a magical setting surrounded by trees and greenery.

To soak up some spectacular views across the city, make your way to the top of Primrose Hill. This grassy area was once a place where duels were fought and prize-fights took place. Now you can see Shakespeare’s Tree, planted to mark the 300th anniversary of Shakespeare’s birth.

How do I get to The Regent’s Park?

The closest Tube stations to The Regent’s Park are Regent’s Park (Bakerloo, City & Hammersmith, Jubilee and Metropolitan lines), Great Portland Street (Metropolitan, Circle, Hammersmith & City lines), Baker Street (Bakerloo, City & Hammersmith, Metropolitan, and Jubilee lines) and St John’s Wood (Jubilee line). All four stations are within a 20-minute walk away.

There are plenty of bus routes with stops close to The Regent’s Park.

Things To Do at Regent’s Park

Walk Along Regent’s Canal (or Even Take a Cruise!)

Truly one of the most beautiful parts of London, the stretch of the Regent’s Canal that curves around the northern edge of Regent’s Park seems like a different world.

No traffic, picturesque views of colourful boats, the draping leaves of trees, and glimpses of beautiful Georgian buildings ( many of which boast a private residence) all come together to make a truly magical experience.

Visit London Zoo

Opened to the public in 1847, London Zoo is home to the Zoological Society of London as well as over 19,000 individual animals.

London Zoo is the world’s oldest scientific zoo and is also home to the first reptile house (featured in the first Harry Potter film), the first public aquarium, and the first children’s (or petting) zoo.

See the London Central Mosque and Islamic Cultural Centre

Sometimes referred to as the Regent’s Park Mosque, the Central London Mosque sits on the western edge of the park.

Completed in 1977, the Mosque can accommodate over 5,000 worshipers and is topped by a beautiful and distinctive golden dome.

The Cultural Centre located within has one of the largest and oldest Islamic reference libraries in the world with over 25,000 books and copies of the Quran in 30 languages.

Hire a Boat at the Boating Lake

This is one for the warmer months! Within Regent’s Park sits the Boating Lake – which is pretty self-explanatory!

Throughout the year, guests can walk along and around the lake and see the wildlife that calls it home.

Sit By a Beautiful Fountain

When visiting Regent’s Park, it’s always worth resting your feet by grabbing a seat on one of the benches near the beautiful Triton Fountain.

A group of bronze sculptures that depict the sea god Triton blowing on a conch shell with two mermaids at his feet, all set in the centre of a round pool, the sculpture was given in memory of the artist Sigismund Goetze by his wife in 1950.

Goetze lived in the area, but he didn’t design the fountain. It’s the work of William McMillan who also designed one of the fountains in Trafalgar Square.

See a Show at the Open Air Theatre

One of the largest theatres in London, with seating for 1,256 guests, the Regent’s Park Open Air Theatre has been putting on productions since 1932, often featuring new takes on classic Shakespeare works.

Stop and Smell the Roses in Queen Mary’s Garden

Named after Queen Mary, wife of King George V, and completed in 1934, this garden is home to approximately 12,000 roses spanning from classic varieties to the most modern.

The entrance to the gardens is marked by the beautiful Jubilee Gates, built to commemorate the Silver Jubilee of King George V and this space is host to flower specimens prized by the royal botanic society.

Quench Your Thirst at a Victorian Water Fountain

Located near the centre of the Broad Walk, a tree-lined avenue that runs from Regent’s Park Underground station in the south to the London Zoo in the north sits one of the most elaborate drinking fountains London has to offer.

Featuring four sides, sporting carvings, and decorations, the fountain is made up of 10 tonnes of Sicilian marble and 4 tonnes of red Abdeen granite.

Unveiled by Princess Mary of Teck (later Queen Mary) in 1869, it was a gift from Sir Cowasjee Jehangir, a wealthy industrialist from Bombay who gave the fountain to Regent’s Park as a thank-you for the protection he and fellow Parsees received from British rule in India.

Things to Know Before You Go Regent’s Park

  • Regent’s Park is a great place to take a time-out from sightseeing.
  • Most of the park’s pathways are paved and wheelchair-accessible. Information boards at entrance points list the most accessible routes in the park.
  • Find several restaurants, cafés, and food and drink kiosks (summer months only) situated around the park.
  • Deck chairs are available to rent between March and October.

How to Get There Regent’s Park

The nearest tube stations are Regent’s Park (Bakerloo line), Great Portland Street (Circle, Hammersmith & City, and Metropolitan lines), and Baker Street (Bakerloo, Circle, Hammersmith & City, Jubilee, and Metropolitan lines), all of which are less than 10 minutes from the park on foot.

When to Get There Regent’s Park

The park is at its liveliest in summer, when events such as open-air theater performances take place and the roses of Queen Mary’s Garden are in bloom. Go early in the morning to see the park at its most peaceful, or ascend to the summit of Primrose Hill (on the north side of the park) at sunset to witness the silhouette of the central London skyline against a dusty golden horizon.

Events at Regent’s Park

Regent’s Park is home to many special events, including food festivals, art fairs, and special days devoted to historical topics, such as the park’s role in World War I. From May through September, the park’s open-air theater hosts drama, comedy, and music performances, as well as outdoor film screenings.


 

 

Sending
User Review
0 (0 votes)